How often do we realize we are on a planet?

How often do we realize we are on a planet?


I recently watched BBC Earth’s Blue Planet documentary series. It made me realize so strongly that we are on a planet after all! It also made me think what we, human beings, are doing on the planet. Are we contributing to keeping its beauty alive or are we just protecting what is left? Are we as a species really using the intelligence we were born with?

Photo by Johny vino on Unsplash

Think about it. Our planet is so beautiful in so many ways – its waters harbor a totally different world than what we have on the land. And the land, with whatever natural patches are left, is equally beautiful. The world beneath is full of life and depicts colors, growth, innovation, survival instincts, different behaviors, etc. How are we, human beings, trying to retain the beauty of this planet we were gifted with? It may sound harsh but from what I have observed, I think we are too busy either consuming it, littering it, or, thanks to a few, preserving what we have been left with.

We must understand that we cannot regenerate the beauty that we originally have or had, on land and underneath. For example, we can only grow trees but we cannot grow mountains, we cannot create new plant species which are good for the planet, in several ways we cannot do what nature can. We can only protect what is left. None of our actions are ever going to make this planet remain as beautiful as we have it today, as the rate of destruction is far greater than the rate of protection.

We are spread all over the land available to us on this planet and yet we have managed to destroy it, unlike our neighbors under the sea who are not only fighting the change of times (forced upon them by human actions) but are also finding ways to innovate to keep their world intact, and it’s nature’s act of balancing. We, on the other hand, are not only largely unaware of how we need to act to keep our planet green and beautiful (I say this largely because of the apathetic attitude of most of us when it comes to environmental issues), but also do not have a plan as a species how to stop generating waste and e-waste, cutting trees, destroying forests, filling wastelands, killing wildlife, wasting natural resources, and finding comfort in ignorance.

The world around me seems too busy with following innumerable purposes except for caring for the planet we are on!

In India when I visit old monuments and sites I realize that our previous generations were very conscious of nature – they were conscious of maintaining hygiene, they had planned cities that took take care of waste, drainage, and severe weather conditions, and they worshipped natural resources and used them with care. They gave a lot of value to planting trees and maintaining the ecological balance. I am sure earlier civilizations across the world would have had a similar philosophy. And with the evolution of human beings, and of technologies, we now have several means of living a more comfortable, sheltered, life with no real requirement of protecting our planet till there is nothing left to consume, or till the time it really hits us with a devastating realization that it’s too late to salvage the planet.

It reminds me of an advertisement on a radio channel in India some time ago. It was something like this – a fire breaks out in a building and people panic. They get desperate to extinguish it but since the city has run dry and there is no water available in large quantity, they start thinking about alternatives – coconut water? bottled water? What can douse a fire except for water? And that’s the message – Save water for a safe future. And that’s so true in case of most of our natural resources.

The recent water crisis in Chennai in India is a sign of a strugglesome future that’s not very far for all of us. It’s actually late but we can still start working as a community across the world, go beyond the boundaries we have marked ourselves in, and change our acts for the greater good, else we are all in our own small and big ways paving a path for our collective suffering, and probably destruction.

Indian startup turns crop residue to usable pulp, assures farmers’ benefit

Indian startup turns crop residue to usable pulp, assures farmers’ benefit


Three graduates from the Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi, Ankur Kumar, Kanika Prajatat and Pracheer Dutta have developed a machine that can convert the hardy straw of paddy into a fibrous raw material that can be used by the pulp molding factories to prepare disposable cutlery.

In India despite a Supreme Court order, and a government scheme that offers stubble management machines at subsidized rates, farmers continue to burn crop residue after harvest, as they find it cheaper than clearing the crop residue manually or by using machines. The practice is rampant across rice-growing belts as paddy straw is neither a suitable fuel nor can be used as cattle feed. The situation is worse in Punjab and Haryana as the smoke resulting from burning the residue chokes Delhi and envelops the entire northern India with dense toxic smog for weeks.

Paddy straw is rich in silica, which slows down its rate of degradation and hence farmers choose to burn it post harvest to make the land reusable faster. The new machine, created by the trio as the first product of their startup Kriya Lab, uses an environment-friendly chemical that can strip the straw of silica, making it supple and usable. The pulp can be used as raw material for the pulp and paper industry. 

For now the machine can convert one ton of paddy straw into 500 kilograms of pulp, which can then be sold at Rs. 45 per kilogram. It holds promise for those who want to start commercially viable ventures as there is a growing demand for ecofriendly cutlery and packaging materials, particularly the ones made from biomass waste. Read more