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Veinus

The Veinus displays vein map of a man’s hand during the pilot at St. John’s Hospital, Bangalore.

A Bangalore-based startup has developed India’s first vein detector, ‘Veinus’, a non-invasive device that could help doctors locate good veins for inserting venous cannula. Veinus is likely to cost about 80% less than the imported vein detectors. Better cannulation with the help of Veinus may mean less number of needle pricks for millions of patients worldwide.

According to a report, even though venous cannulas are often needed for a week or more, they frequently fail before the end of treatment because of irritation of the vein and therefore necessitate cannula removal and replacement. Replacement requires additional needle pricks for patients, increases work for clinical staff, and contributes to insertion of cannulas being the most common invasive medical procedure and therefore a substantial contributor to healthcare costs.

In a step to aid this medical procedure, Bangalore-based Infraeyes Private Limited developed Veinus, a vein detecting device that uses infrared light to display map of good, thick, as well as thrombosed veins under the skin.

Founded in 2011 by Priyank Saxena, 38, along with Mayank Saxena, his brother, and  Saurabh Gupta, Infraeyes now has a team of six engineers who have contributed in  making Veinus. The device is set to be launched in the market this month (July  2014). Read full report on Page 2

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Most schools in rural India can’t afford basic supplies like desks, and most of the students attending them can’t afford backpacks. To address this, Bombay-based nonprofit Aarambh worked with designers to come up with an ingenious solution that can transform old cardboard boxes into a convertible desk and school bag.

The result, Help Desk, folds quickly from one thing to the other; at the end of the day, a few simple moves turn the desk back into a bag to carry books home. The design ended up costing only about 20 cents to make since it’s made from used cardboard. The designers prototyped a few different variations to test with the students, looking for a solution that would be ergonomically correct as a desk and is also easy to build. So far, the final design has been given to 10,000 students at 600 schools.

The desk-bags don’t last forever, especially since cardboard doesn’t stand up well to the rain. But the team is working on developing a low-cost material that can be coated on the surface to help it repel water. Right now, they only last about six months to a year. But anytime they need to be replaced, it’s simple to make again. Read more


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