Indian Startup Launches Wireless Charging Pad for Mobile Devices

Indian Startup Launches Wireless Charging Pad for Mobile Devices


India-based technology startup PowerSquare is all set to launch Qi Wireless Charging Pad, based on the company’s patent-pending Adaptive Position-Free (APF) technology that allows users to simultaneously charge multiple Qi-compatible mobile devices.

Using APF system, multiple mobile devices can be wirelessly charge by placing them over the Qi Wireless Charging Pad without bothering about the position of placing the devices. The APF system enabled Pad is compatible with newer as well as older mobile devices, meeting the safety specifications (WPC1.1 FOD) of the Wireless Power Consortium. Read more

 

 

CarIQ Device Allows You to Snoop on the Chauffeur

CarIQ Device Allows You to Snoop on the Chauffeur


Indian tech startup CarIQ Technologies has developed a wireless device to allow users keep a virtual eye on their chauffeurs. The device plugs into the data port of a car and serves as a sort of nanny cam for the driver, streaming information to the owner’s mobile phone.

According to CarIQ’s founder Sagar Apte, the product is particularly helpful for folks with drivers. Along with car’s location, CarIQ can share information about how the driver is driving, whether the car is being misused.

 

 

Similar devices are used in the U.S. to monitor teenagers’ driving habits. But CarIQ is targeting Indian customers that want to make sure that their car isn’t being taken for a joyride while they are having dinner or are on a holiday abroad.

The CarIQ, which looks like a chubby, white memory stick, is plugged into a data port below the steering wheel of a car. It uses a SIM card and GPS to track the vehicles location and also collects data on how it is being driven. All that information is uploaded to the Internet so users can keep track of their cars through their cell phones. So, if your driver is racing the car somewhere far away, the device will pinpoint where the car is, at what speed it is being driven and even whether it is being driven rashly, as the CarIQ monitors sudden stops and acceleration.

The CarIQ also alerts users to engine and battery problems or the need for a tune up. It can also help drivers get better gas mileage. Read more

New AI-based Smartphone App Reacts to Facial Expressions

New AI-based Smartphone App Reacts to Facial Expressions


Chennai-based Mad Street Den startup has built a cloud-based platform that uses artificial intelligence to enable any smartphone with a camera to identify faces, detect facial expressions and emotions, and react to facial and head gestures. The expression acts as a trigger for a certain action, for example, frowning at the phone when an unwanted call comes in could make it shut down forthwith, or lifting an eyebrow could send the caller a message asking ‘What now?’

This image-recognizing platform, called MAD Stack, can be used by app developers and companies to create a futuristic mobile user experience. Mad Street Den founders Ashwini Asokan and Anand Chandrasekaran  explain that the idea is to make machines more useful by making them a bit human: fun, intelligent, and relevant.

The process of recognizing a human expression or responding to a gesture is simple for a human brain, but quite complex for a smartphone camera to do digitally. It is artificial intelligence that enables a camera to do this. What’s more, the app keeps getting smarter with use, through machine learning algorithms. Read more

Bluetooth Ring Could Convert Palm into Gesture Interface

Bluetooth Ring Could Convert Palm into Gesture Interface


Rohildev N., 23, from Kerela has developed a device called Fin, a tiny hardware that one can wear on one’s thumb as a ring and which converts the whole palm into a gesture interface. Fin has been created at Rohildev’s RHL Vision Technologies at the Startup Village in Kochi. 

Wearable devices are the next stage of computing and the thumb ring developed by Rohil and his team is stylish and easy to use. Fin, worn as a ring on your thumb, has sensors that can uniquely recognize each segment (phalange) of the fingers and identify various parts of the palm by calculating their distance from the thumb. So you can assign different functions to each finger segment, and can perform a function by making your thumb touch the relevant segment. This means that the simple touch of your thumb on a finger segment can send an emergency alert, silence your phone, move to the next track on your playlist, or pick up a call – all without you actually touching the device.

It uses smart low energy technology such as Bluetooth for communication with connected devices. Fin, according to a report in the Indian Science Journal (ISJ) website, can transmit natural gestures as commands to any connected Bluetooth device, such as a smartphone, a music player, a gaming console, a digital interface inside a car, a television set or a home automation device. 

According to Rohildev, if you have home automation devices, your palm can operate those without raising a hand or any gestures, unlike other touchless technologies. 

Made out of durable, waterproof and dustproof material, a single Fin will be capable of supporting up to three devices at a time. It will come with a custom Lithium ion battery with micro-USB charging dock and last more than one month on full charge.

Fin will be priced at $120 each, but that cost could come down with mass manufacturing. Read more

Indian Startup Uses Live Traffic Heatmaps To Provide Cabs

Indian Startup Uses Live Traffic Heatmaps To Provide Cabs


Getting a cab in Indian metro cities is a tough task. It’s even harder in India’s financial capital – Mumbai, Maharashtra, because there are fewer of them plying the streets. For Mumbai’s 15 million populace, there are just 60,000 taxis available.

A Mumbai-based startup Olacabs has devised a clever technology in hope of closing the gap between India’s infrastructure issues and providing a cab more reliably than its peers. It gives each of its drivers an Android phone to take bookings. And each phone is enabled with an Olacabs application that helps to form a live heatmap of traffic in the cities, and notify the driver of the jams.

The booking information is also crunched by Olacabs to help predict taxi demand ahead of time, and sends more drivers out to areas expecting bookings so that they can respond to online bookings sooner. The company has also built its own mapping layer over Google Maps that has been translated to local dialects for drivers. Founded in January 2011, Olacabs currently operates in Mumbai, Delhi, Bangalore and Pune. Read more