Technology Innovations

Archive for the ‘July’ Category


Indian-origin researchers from the University of Washington (UW) have developed a new gesture-recognition technology called WiSee that leverages Wi-Fi signals to detect specific movements, without needing sensors on the human body or cameras.

Reasearchers have shown that by using an adapted Wi-Fi router and a few wireless devices in the living room, users could control their electronics and household appliances from any room in the home with a simple gesture. Read more

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Two scientists, Professor Siddharth Ramachandran of Boston University and Alan Willner of University of Southern California, have devised a new fibre optic technology that promises to increase bandwidth dramatically, easing Internet congestion and video streaming.

The technology centers on donut-shaped laser light beams called optical vortices, in which the light twists like a tornado as it moves along the beam path, rather than in a straight line. Widely studied in molecular biology, atomic physics and quantum optics, optical vortices (also known as orbital angular momentum, or OAM, beams) were thought to be unstable in fibre, until the duo recently designed an optical fibre that can propagate them.

In the paper in journal Science, he and Willner demonstrated the stability of the beams in optical fibre and also their potential to boost Internet bandwidth.

Traditionally, bandwidth has been enhanced by increasing the number of colours, or wavelengths of data-carrying laser signals – essentially streams of 1s and 0s – sent down on an optical fibre, where the signals are processed according to colour.

Prof. Ramachandran’s and Willner’s approach combines strategies, packing several colours into each mode, and using multiple modes. In their experiments, they created an OAM fibre with four modes (an optical fibre typically has two), and showed that for each OAM mode, they could send data through a one-kilometre fibre in 10 different colours, resulting in a transmission capacity of 1.6 terabits per second. Read more


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